People and Places

I was just looking through Facebook memories from my trip of nine years ago. A photo of St John’s Gate in Clerkenwell caught my eye, and inspired me to blog after a long absence!

I confess that this is not my camera expertise!, most photos anywhere in Britain are either full of people or cars!

My go-to quick information page is Wikipedia, and the following photos come from there:

 

It was the next sketch that fired my interest the most:

Thomas and Sarah Roydhouse, as well as young Henry and William were less than 15 minutes walk from here during this time frame.

Also, as noted an a very early post, so were the Maxton family and the Dunn family.

In the Census– of 1841

In 1853, William married Mary Jordan, and the adress  was given as 1 St John’s Square, which is pictured in this sketch.

152 years on

The good ship Asterope arrived in Wellington New Zealand on the 8th October 1868, 152 years ago.

Onboard, the Roydhouse family, which included five young children were immigrating to commence William’s new employment to install cabling around the North Island.

William and Mary would surely be proud patriarch and matriarch of the growing branches of Australian and New Zealand Roydhouse descendants.

Mary Johns Roydhouse nee Jordan

With a strong focus on newspapers originally, the 21st century family has really diversified in their occupations.

A quick Google search revealed 24 of them:

Soccer player USA from NZ

Fencing contractors Australia

Female Indie singer Australia

CEO engineering Australia

Ophthalmologist Australia

Scientific researcher Australia

Management services Australia

Tech entrepreneur Australia

Education Australia

Cosmetic nurse Australia

Pharmacist/brewer Australia

Senior research Fellow Australia

Clinical Lab Doctor Australia

Male Indie singer Australia

Basketball player NZ

Plumbing business Australia

Casino food & beverage manager Australia

Trekking, fund-raising Australia

Children’s counsellor Australia

Construction director Australia

Executive producer advertising production NZ

Renovation company NZ

Professional musician NZ/Australia

 

** All photos were on Google images in publicly available places. This blog is not available in the public domain**

Elizabeth Roydhouse

James and Mary baptised a daughter, Elizabeth in 1797.

https://wp.me/p9wfSj-hG

In 1813 a baptism was performed at St Giles in the Fields, Holborn for an Eliza Roydhouse, base-born child of Elizabeth, servant and the reputed father, Hugh Elliott, gentleman. St. Giles in the Fields

Store Street,5 minutes walk from St Giles Church.

Almost 20 years later, a marriage for an Eliza Roydhouse to widower Robert Crook was performed by Banns on the 1st April 1832 at St Mary’s, Islington.

St Mary’s Church is about half an hours walk from where her grandmother Mary lived with Walter Mapperly, her second husband at his death in 1847. The map also shows how close Rawstorne Street is to these other locations.

 

 

In 1835, the death of a one year old Robert Crook is a strong possibility to be Eliza and Robert’s first child.

From that date, the fate of this family has no real proofs or evidence although the death in 1857 in St Giles district is a strong possibility.

James Roydhouse

James Roydhouse was a son of Henry and Ann (nee Appleby), born in Hertingfordbury on the 27th May, 1763. This makes him my 4 times great uncle!

On the 23rd July, 1783, a trial at the Old Bailey found James guilty of fraud, for “unlawfully, knowingly and designedly obtaining ” from William Hill six 8″ brass case locks, valued at forty shillings.

Punishment: Whipping, and discharged

He married Mary Smiths/Clark on the 1st of July, 1792 at Spitalfields Christ Church in London.

(“Photo by DAVID ILIFF. License: CC BY-SA 3.0”)

A daughter, Elizabeth was born about 1797.

James and Mary lived in Clerkenwell Close from 1801 ( or earlier) until 1827, when James died.

Mary remarried very shortly after to widower Walter Mapperly.

Walter died in Skinner Street, Islington in 1847 and by the 1851 census Mary was living on Parish Relief at 16 Upper Rosoman Street, Clerkenwell, about a 5 minute walk from the families of Thomas Roydhouse, her first brother-in-law.

Elizabeth Pickup

Thomas married Elizabeth Pickup in 1716 and his son Thomas was baptised January 1718, and buried in 1719 in Pontefract.
Last name: Pickup
This unusual surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a locational name from a place in Lancashire called Pickup (Bank), now styled Yate and Pickup Bank. The name has branched out strongly,and can be easily traced back to the neighbourhood of Blackburn as its original home.
Approximately 6,288 people bear this surname today around the world.
Recorded as “Pycoppe” in “Records of the Manors of Henry de Lacy”, dated 1296, and as “Pickope Bank” in “Place Names of Lancashire”, dated 1595, the name derives from the Olde English pre 7th Century “pic”, peak, point, with “copp”, top, summit; hence, “hill with a peak or sharp point”.
Locational surnames were originally given to the lord of the manor, or as a means of identification to those who left their place of origin to settle elsewhere.
Regional and dialectal influences subsequently produced many variations in the spelling of the name, which, in the modern idiom, range from Piccop, Picopp and Peacop to Pickhup, Pickupp, Pickopp, Picup and others.
There are several records of the name Pickup in Pontefract records, but I have found no trace of an Elizabeth there in the right timeframe.

name born died married spouse father mother
Joseph 1692 Robert
Robert 1694 Robert
William 1696 1696 Robert
Richard 1698 Robert
John 1699 Robert
Esther 1700 1730 George Burrough Robert
Francis 1702 Robert
William 1704 Robert

Thomas 1709 1709 illegitimate Dorothy
Dorothy 1714
Anne 1717
Robert 1726
Martha 1735

It is unlikely that Elizabeth was a daughter of Robert Pickup, but I can’t find a marriage for him in this area either. It appears he was born in Ackworth, about 3 miles from Pontefract in 1660, and had a brother John and sister Hester. Dorothy who baptised and buried her son Thomas appears to have been born there in 1686.
There is an Elizabeth baptised in Lower Darwen, Lancashire,(some 55 miles away) daughter of Thomas in 1703, making her 15 at marriage, and another born to Jacob Pickup of Elland (25 miles away) in 1690.
The presence of the large castle as a place of employment and the other businesses this would attract to the large marketplace in Pontefract would account for young people or even whole families relocating.

Yorkshire at last!

The hamlet of Roydhouse in the West Riding of Yorkshire consists of a few

farms and a pub.

A hamlet is defined as a small settlement, generally one smaller than a

village, and strictly one without a church.

To start the investigation of the assorted Roydhouse families throughout

Yorkshire, I first decided to follow the theory that the surname may have

originated from that area of the West Riding.

 

3 Acres  Inn, Roydhouse, Shelley, Yorkshire.

The closest ancient church is All Hallows Parish Church in Kirkburton, about 2 miles away.

Kirkburton Church is dedicated to All Hallows. It was built in 1190, and is now classified as a Grade I listed building. Most of the structure is 13th century although parts have been rebuilt. The tower was added in the 15th century. Inside the church is a late-medieval nave ceiling, large wooden pulpit, stone font and Elizabethan and Jacobean pews. A small window in the chancel may have opened from the cell of a hermit.

A restored 10th century stone crucifix can be found inside, supporting the belief that another church or Christian settlement may have existed on this site. The church has undergone extensive restoration.

The church records mostly show burials appear from the early 1800’s, though a few survive and are legible from the 1700’s. No Roydhouse (or other variant) burial is recorded, however this does not mean there were none. Over the centuries churchyards can become overgrown, run-down, stones become impossible to read and even broken, and old church records lost due to fire, flood, or war.

Going further  back in time I discovered the accepted meaning of the name, Roydhouse.

ROYD (Scandinavian.) Dweller at a forest-clearing

ROYDHOUSE (Scandinavian.) Dweller at the Clearing-House.

The Domesday Book of 1086 showed that much of the woodland of Britain was still intact. It was a very detailed survey of land held throughout William the Conqueror’s Britain and designed to gather taxes and revenue.In the north, and Yorkshire in particular, the land clearance was the work of the Scandinavians who first settled from A.D 867 in the Danelaw region.

 

My DNA test kit revealed a 25% Scandinavian heritage.

I knew I identified with Hagar and Helga!!

 

 

Unravelling Yorkshire

The hamlet of Roydhouse in the West Riding of Yorkshire consists of a few farms and a pub.
A hamlet is defined as a small settlement, generally one smaller than a village, and strictly one without a church.
To start the investigation of the assorted Roydhouse families throughout Yorkshire, I first decided to follow the theory that the surname may have originated from that area of the West Riding.

Roydhouse Hamlet location

3 Acres Inn, Roydhouse, Shelley, Yorkshire.

 

The closest ancient church is All Hallows Parish Church in Kirkburton, about 2 miles away.

Kirkburton Church is dedicated to All Hallows. It was built in 1190, and is now classified as a Grade I listed building. Most of the structure is 13th century although parts have been rebuilt. The tower was added in the 15th century. Inside the church is a late-medieval nave ceiling, large wooden pulpit, stone font and Elizabethan and Jacobean pews. A small window in the chancel may have opened from the cell of a hermit. A restored 10th century stone crucifix can be found inside, supporting the belief that another church or Christian settlement may have existed on this site. The church has undergone extensive restoration.
The church records mostly show burials appear from the early 1800’s, though a few survive and are legible from the 1700’s. No Roydhouse (or other variant) burial is recorded, however this does not mean there were none. Over the centuries churchyards can become overgrown, run-down, stones become impossible to read and even broken, and old church records lost due to fire, flood, or war.

Meanings of the surname  discovered vary only slightly, dweller by the marsh or dweller by the clearing.

ROYD (Scand.) Dweller at a forest-clearing

ROYDHOUSE (Scand.) Dweller at the Clearing-House

The Domesday Book of 1086 showed that much of the woodland of Britain was still intact. It was a very detailed survey of land held throughout William the Conquerors Britain and designed to gather taxation revenue.
In the north, and Yorkshire in particular, the land clearance was the work of the Scandinavians who first settled from A.D 867 in the Danelaw region.

My DNA test kit revealed a 7% Scandinavian heritage. Probably related to Hagar and Helga!

So, it’s Goodbye, Britannia Row…

Last weeks post about Frederick was the last of the Britannia Row connections, and

has been an interesting way of linking family stories together.

The connection with Islington was broken mainly due to slum clearances, war

bombings and the Governments decision to build big blocks of housing flats in nearby

suburbs for low income families.

I rather suspect if at all possible, the extended Roydhouse families would have stayed

longer. The connection lasted over 70 years.

This was also the last post about the Roydhouse family in London that are proved to be

connected to the Roydhouse families of New Zealand and Australia.

Of course, Thomas Roydhouse from Yorkshire was not the only Roydhouse to start a

new life in the city of London.

I touched on the life of Charles Potter Roydhouse last year, and hope to continue with

his family connections in the next few weeks, as well as explore the lives of the other

London Roydhouse families.

Frederick John Richard Thomas Roydhouse

Frederick John Richard Thomas Roydhouse was born in the November of 1907.

He was 5 years old when his youngest brother Edward died aged 2.

The family were all living at number 60 Britannia Row in 1934::

Parents Frederick and Louisa (aged almost 60)

Daughter: Louisa and husband Arthur (almost 30)

Son: Alfred Frederick George (age 41)

Son: Frederick John Richard Thomas (age 27)

His mother Louisa died later in 1934, and his father in October 1936.

Frederick married Kathleen Ann Cook in 1937.

The couple appear to have had no children.

He died on the 16th April 1975 at number 16, “Henshall Point”, Bromley High Street,

about 5 miles away from Islington.

Kathleen died in 1996.

Louisa Charlotte Lilian Roydhouse

 Louise Charlotte Lilian was the only daughter born to Frederick and Louisa, and they baptised her on the 12th August 1906 at St James the Apostle, Islington.

The Electoral Roll of 1929 shows the families at 60 Britannia Row.

She married Arthur Frederick Foulger in 1930, and continued living with family.

Their children:

1. Arthur F. born Islington 1931 married Beryl Hitchman in Watford in 1952

2. Dorothy M. born 17th April 1932 Islington married Byron F. Jenkins in Watford in 1950, died 1982 in Lambeth

3. Louisa F. registered Islington 1933 married Reginald C. Alexander in Watford in 1951.

4. Emily L. registered Islington 1933 married L. Pearce in Watford in 1948.

5. Edith Mary born Finsbury 9 Oct 1936 married Gerald Farmer in 1958 in Watford, a daughter Tina. Died 1992, Hertfordshire

6. William registered Finsbury 1936 married Barbara Lovett in 1957 in Watford.

7. Margaret R. born married Allan L. Northcott in 1958 in Watford.

8. Edward J. born Watford 1941 married Sylvia Kingston in Amersham in 1968.

Arthur died in Watford in 1972.

She died a few months past her 100th birthday in 2006, in Watford, London.